Bay Journal

Opinion

Why cut a $73 million program that provides billions in benefits?

There is more good news for the Bay this spring. There is clear consensus in the scientific community that the health of the Bay is improving. In the last five months, the Chesapeake Bay Foundation’s State of the Bay report, the Chesapeake Bay Program’s Bay Barometer, and the University of Maryland’s Center for Environmental Science’s Bay Report Card all show progress.

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Memories still alive, thriving at Horton homestead

The smell of the piney woods and the call of bobwhite quail; tracks of my toy wagon in the soft sand road bordered by ditches alive with tadpoles; the warm odors of the grain bin where mom stashed me as she rolled it through the chicken houses at feeding time; racing to pick up bloody squirrels as they tumbled to the ground after blasts from dad’s shotgun.

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The Bay Program: It takes a partnership to save an estuary

As the story goes, the cleanup of the Chesapeake Bay began with a boat trip. In 1973, after hearing reports of the estuary’s ailing health, Sen. Charles “Mac” Mathias, R-MD, set out on a “fact-finding tour”: a five-day trip traversing the Maryland portion of the Bay and hearing firsthand the experiences of 150 watermen, scientists, farmers, businesses and other area residents.

What he heard and saw troubled him. Harvests of oysters, crabs and fish were declining; watermen, fishermen and others who depended on the seafood industry were going out of business.

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Local companies making it their business to help the Chesapeake

Many indicators of water quality and habitat show that progress is slowly being made in the restoration of the Chesapeake Bay and its watershed. But we would probably all agree that it will take commitment from all segments of society and a broad base of participation to be successful in sustaining the restoration effort as well as continuing to meet our goals in the long term.

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Get to know the Bay better during Chesapeake Awareness Week

In 2016, the legislatures of each of the Chesapeake Bay watershed commonwealths and states designated the second week of June as Chesapeake Bay Awareness Week. This designation urges all Bay residents “to commemorate the week with events, activities and educational programs designed to raise awareness of the importance of the Chesapeake Bay” to each jurisdiction as well as to the region, and the United States.

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Abandoning sanctuaries means giving up on oyster restoration

Maryland established its Oyster Advisory Commission in the latter half of 2007 to engage a wide range of interested people to consider strategies for bringing back a robust native oyster population in the Chesapeake Bay.

The commission was established at a time when hope for native oysters had all but vanished, not unlike the oysters population itself — which was, and still is, estimated to be about 1 percent of what it was centuries ago.

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Assertions about menhaden population were a bit fishy

In his recent Bay Journal op-ed, Don’t let menhaden become a case of could have, should have, would have, March 2017, Bill Bartlett claims that menhaden are both scarce and unregulated in the Chesapeake Bay.

Neither assertion is true according to the latest and best science on menhaden. This data instead indicate that this species is being managed sustainably and responsibly.

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Our streams could just die for more riparian forest buffers

A few weeks ago, the Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay hosted a forum in Buckeystown, MD, where more than 100 representatives from federal and state agencies, nonprofits and businesses, as well as the scientific and farming communities, met to discuss riparian buffers.

This community of conservationists has been planting trees along waterways for more than 25 years. Sometimes, it seems more like a life’s mission to re-establish these links between land and water that protected our watershed’s creeks and rivers for eons.

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Opinion: Archives

Terrapin park shows importance of access to the Bay

The Terrapin Nature Area in Stevensville, MD, reminds me why I’ve committed my career to conservation. This gorgeous park hides in plain sight on Kent Island, waving to everyone traveling eastward over the Bay Bridge, and offers so...

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Around the Watershed

The Bay Program: It takes a partnership to save an estuary

As the story goes, the cleanup of the Chesapeake Bay began with a boat trip. In 1973, after hearing reports of the estuary’s ailing health, Sen. Charles “Mac” Mathias, R-MD, set out on a “fact-finding tour”: a five-day trip traversing the Maryland portion of...

We must turn instant gratification into burning desire for clean Bay

The views expressed by columnists do not necessarily reflect those of the Bay Journal. The Earth is about 4.5 billion years old, or 4.5 eons. Of that time, humans have only been around for about 200,000 years, with civilization only beginning about 6,000 years ago and industrialization,...

We need to recognize the many faces that make up the Bay watershed

In an effort to create a better environment for everyone, the conservation world takes a vital step: including everyone. The Chesapeake, the largest of more than 100 U.S. estuaries, is a trove of biodiversity. The Bay’s watershed stretches from New York to Virginia and boasts more...

Read more Around the Watershed »

Chesapeake Born

Memories still alive, thriving at Horton homestead

The smell of the piney woods and the call of bobwhite quail; tracks of my toy wagon in the soft sand road bordered by ditches alive with tadpoles; the warm odors of the grain bin where mom stashed me as she rolled it through the chicken houses at feeding time; racing to pick up bloody...

Science saved the day for crabs, but a hero’s battles are never over

The views expressed by columnists do not necessarily reflect those of the Bay Journal. Dear Governor Hogan, Please watch the Bay Journal’s recent film, Beautiful Swimmers Revisited. It celebrates a great Chesapeake success story, to which you seem dedicated to writing a bad new...

Baltimore’s ‘most elegant’ new community not fit for a fish

It has been my joy and anguish through the last five decades to keep track of little Dipping Pond Run, a rare and trouty tributary of Baltimore’s central drainage way, the Jones Falls. Exquisitely sensitive to water quality, trout are not just a fish, but an idea, a synecdoche...

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Conservation Matters

Terrapin park shows importance of access to the Bay

The Terrapin Nature Area in Stevensville, MD, reminds me why I’ve committed my career to conservation. This gorgeous park hides in plain sight on Kent Island, waving to everyone traveling eastward over the Bay Bridge, and offers so much to its visitors. Managed by Queen...

Immerse yourself in Dumbarton Oaks Park

The Japanese have a practice translated in English as “forest bathing,” in which people immerse themselves in a forest as a preventative health measure. Studies have shown tremendous benefits of this practice, including lower blood pressure, reduced stress and improved sleep,...

At the ten-year mark, happy birthday to the Bay’s beautiful and profoundly historic national trail

As the National Park Service celebrates its centennial this year, we are also celebrating the 10th anniversary of a national park we have right here in our collective backyard: the Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail. Winding through much of the Chesapeake region, the...

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Forum

Why cut a $73 million program that provides billions in benefits?

The views expressed by columnists do not necessarily reflect those of the Bay Journal. There is more good news for the Bay this spring. There is clear consensus in the scientific community that the health of the Bay is improving. In the last five months, the Chesapeake Bay...

Quit shooting the bull – get livestock out of Bay’s streams

For decades, the Chesapeake Bay region states and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency have recognized that one of the most obvious and affordable ways to reduce pollution in the estuary — Bay Cleanup 101 — is to fence cattle out of streams. When they defecate, cows...

Abandoning sanctuaries means giving up on oyster restoration

The views expressed by columnists do not necessarily reflect those of the Bay Journal. Maryland established its Oyster Advisory Commission in the latter half of 2007 to engage a wide range of interested people to consider strategies for bringing back a robust native oyster population in...

Read more Forum »

Letters to the Editor

Elect to protect Eastern Shore

Thank goodness the election is finally over. I heard the term “election stress disorder” this fall and it immediately resonated with me and many others I know. Part of the stress for me related to the continuous news cycle and overwhelmingly negative tone of the presidential...

Bay needs menhaden more than reduction industry

Much has been written and discussed about menhaden (Brevootia tyrannus), a forage fish for many other fish, birds and mammals. Recently, a bill was introduced into the Virginia Legislature to move the management of these fish from the Virginia Legislature to the Virginia Marine Resources...

Biodiversity needs human diversity among those who protect it

I read with great interest the Bay Journal’s recent article, “The ‘green ceiling’: Environmental organizations lack diversity” (November 2014). As an African American woman fish and wildlife biologist, there were not many faces that looked like mine as I...

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Message from the Alliance

Local companies making it their business to help the Chesapeake

Many indicators of water quality and habitat show that progress is slowly being made in the restoration of the Chesapeake Bay and its watershed. But we would probably all agree that it will take commitment from all segments of society and a broad base of participation to be successful in...

Get to know the Bay better during Chesapeake Awareness Week

In 2016, the legislatures of each of the Chesapeake Bay watershed commonwealths and states designated the second week of June as Chesapeake Bay Awareness Week. This designation urges all Bay residents “to commemorate the week with events, activities and educational programs designed...

Our streams could just die for more riparian forest buffers

A few weeks ago, the Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay hosted a forum in Buckeystown, MD, where more than 100 representatives from federal and state agencies, nonprofits and businesses, as well as the scientific and farming communities, met to discuss riparian buffers. This community of...

Read more Message from the Alliance »

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