Bay Journal

Opinion: Chesapeake Born

Tangier Island needs help no matter how you define its woes

When I began a documentary film this year about climate change and the Chesapeake, I knew that even though local residents were affected by it, I’d never be able to record most of them talking about sea level rise.

They know what they see. And around Dorchester — Maryland’s lowest-lying county and the focus of our film — residents see erosion of the shoreline, high tides that seem to come more often and forests dying along the marsh edges.

It’s easy to talk past one another, we who are comfortable with the lingo and concepts of climate science, and those who are not — even while all talking about the same thing.

[Continue Reading]

What’s black and white and should be read by greens?

People are surprised when I say that for my profession of environmental writing, I read as much as I can absorb about economics and business. Put articles from the Sierra Club, The Nature Conservancy or the Chesapeake Bay Foundation next...

Lessons from Accidental Oyster Sanctuaries

The oysters came up in the dredge like I hadn’t seen them in 50 years (and rarely even back then): huge and clumped together and bedecked with sponges and all manner of marine organisms, including younger oysters, thriving in the...

Loading...

More articles »

About Chesapeake Born

Observations from Tom Horton, who spent more than three decades writing about the Chesapeake for the Baltimore Sun, and is author of six books about the Bay. A native of the Eastern shore, he truly is “Chesapeake Born.”

Copyright ©2017 Bay Journal / Bay Journal Media / Advertise with Us

Terms of use | Privacy Policy